July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 25

Day 25 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I deliberately look for positive aspects in myself and others.

As you are deliberately looking for positive aspects in yourself or in others, you will find more of those things.  ~  Abraham

Don’t center on your anxiety, Obi-Wan.  Keep your concentration here and now where it belongs.   ~  Qui-Gon Jin in The Phantom Menace Star Wars Series


The Mindfulness Path to Peace With What Is

Spilt Milk

You go to pick up another dish and knock over a glass of milk. Milk is dripping down over the counter, into drawers, and making a puddle on the floor. Now you are at choice. Do you start berating yourself for not being more careful, yell at your partner for distracting you so that you weren’t aware of the glass, and complaining that there is no towel in easy reach or . . . do you just get on with wiping it up and appreciating that you’ve cleaned up a drawer that has needed attention and the glass did not break?

Okay, that’s not an earth shattering event, but it is a clear example of our choice to come to peace or not with what is, no matter what occurred. Yes, the initial reaction may be anger, fear, or disbelief to what you don’t like or approve of, but then what are you going to do. Will you stay out of clear alignment or come to peace and back into resonance with the vibration of your Inner Being and Source?

What Is – Was.

What is – just is. Our reactions and perceptions are always ours to make. Mindful living means being aware of not only what happened, but also your feelings that tell you if you are clearly aligned or not.

Now – what is – is a continual stream of “nows”. It may help to accept without judgment what is to realize:

  • • It is constantly changing.
  • • It already happened. You may have a take away from it, but you cannot take it away or undo it. No amount of anger, fear, or disbelief will erase it.
  • • What it gives you is information about what you are vibrating, your point of attraction. What you manifest is always, no exceptions, a match to what you are vibrating. If it is what you want, keep up the good work. If it isn’t, change the thoughts of the Voice in your head.
  • • What is – clarifies what you do want. A manifestation of what you do not want makes very clear what you do want.

Process

Antidote Thoughts

Singer-songwriter, Jewel, was in her early 20’s when she was cast in her first movie, Ride with the Devil. Her anxiety went into overdrive she says, as she struggled with the pervasive thought, “I don’t know what I’m doing!” Her normal practices helped but not enough. So she created what she calls Antidote Thoughts, a practice she still uses today.

Again and again she turned to an Antidote Thought. “It would help me refocus in the moment and be receptive to actually get the information I needed to try and do a good job.” She recalls.

When negative thoughts –“lies your mind tells you,” Jewel calls them – take over she goes for the antidote. Starting with the opposite thought and working from there to find something that feels more true to you – feels good.

Example:

She started with the opposite thought from, “I don’t know what I am doing!” – “I do know what I’m doing,” and using her body as a barometer, tried it on for size. She could feel that this thought wasn’t true. So she experimented with other antidote thoughts. When she said, “I’m capable of learning and I won’t quit.” Her anxiety, her body, instantly felt calmer. That was her truth.

When you are experiencing a negative thought pattern try saying or writing antidote (opposite) thoughts until you find ones that feel good to think about.

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 24

Day 24 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I look for the optimistic view point.

We’re asking you to trust in the Well-being. In optimism there is magic. In pessimism there is nothing. In positive expectation there is thrill and success. In pessimism or awareness of what is not wanted, there is nothing.  ~ Abraham

Trust your feelings, Luke.  ~  Obi-Wan Kenobi in Star Wars


The Mindfulness Path to Peace With What Is

Spilt Milk

You go to pick up another dish and knock over a glass of milk. Milk is dripping down over the counter, into drawers, and making a puddle on the floor. Now you are at choice. Do you start berating yourself for not being more careful, yell at your partner for distracting you so that you weren’t aware of the glass, and complaining that there is no towel in easy reach or . . . do you just get on with wiping it up and appreciating that you’ve cleaned up a drawer that has needed attention and the glass did not break?

Okay, that’s not an earth shattering event, but it is a clear example of our choice to come to peace or not with what is, no matter what occurred. Yes, the initial reaction may be anger, fear, or disbelief to what you don’t like or approve of, but then what are you going to do. Will you stay out of clear alignment or come to peace and back into resonance with the vibration of your Inner Being and Source?

What Is – Was.

What is – just is. Our reactions and perceptions are always ours to make. Mindful living means being aware of not only what happened, but also your feelings that tell you if you are clearly aligned or not.

Now – what is – is a continual stream of “nows”. It may help to accept without judgment what is to realize:

  • • It is constantly changing.
  • • It already happened. You may have a take away from it, but you cannot take it away or undo it. No amount of anger, fear, or disbelief will erase it.
  • • What it gives you is information about what you are vibrating, your point of attraction. What you manifest is always, no exceptions, a match to what you are vibrating. If it is what you want, keep up the good work. If it isn’t, change the thoughts of the Voice in your head.
  • • What is – clarifies what you do want. A manifestation of what you do not want makes very clear what you do want.

Process

Antidote Thoughts

Singer-songwriter, Jewel, was in her early 20’s when she was cast in her first movie, Ride with the Devil. Her anxiety went into overdrive she says, as she struggled with the pervasive thought, “I don’t know what I’m doing!” Her normal practices helped but not enough. So she created what she calls Antidote Thoughts, a practice she still uses today.

Again and again she turned to an Antidote Thought. “It would help me refocus in the moment and be receptive to actually get the information I needed to try and do a good job.” She recalls.

When negative thoughts –“lies your mind tells you,” Jewel calls them – take over she goes for the antidote. Starting with the opposite thought and working from there to find something that feels more true to you – feels good.

Example:

She started with the opposite thought from, “I don’t know what I am doing!” – “I do know what I’m doing,” and using her body as a barometer, tried it on for size. She could feel that this thought wasn’t true. So she experimented with other antidote thoughts. When she said, “I’m capable of learning and I won’t quit.” Her anxiety, her body, instantly felt calmer. That was her truth.

When you are experiencing a negative thought pattern try saying or writing antidote (opposite) thoughts until you find ones that feel good to think about.

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 23

Day 23 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

No matter where I am, no matter what I am doing, no matter who I am with, I look for what makes me feel good.

You did not say, “Let’s go forth into this physical experience and take all the ideas that exist and whittle them down to just a few good ideas that we can all agree on and peacefully cohabitate.” Instead you said, “Let’s go forth and take the ideas that exist and expand them to more. Let’s let the contrast be more so that the desires can be more, so that the Energy will have more avenues to which to flow.” ~  Abraham

Always remember . . . your focus determines your reality.     ~  Qui-Gon Jin in The Phantom Menace Star Wars Series


The Mindfulness Path to Peace With What Is

Spilt Milk

You go to pick up another dish and knock over a glass of milk. Milk is dripping down over the counter, into drawers, and making a puddle on the floor. Now you are at choice. Do you start berating yourself for not being more careful, yell at your partner for distracting you so that you weren’t aware of the glass, and complaining that there is no towel in easy reach or . . . do you just get on with wiping it up and appreciating that you’ve cleaned up a drawer that has needed attention and the glass did not break?

Okay, that’s not an earth shattering event, but it is a clear example of our choice to come to peace or not with what is, no matter what occurred. Yes, the initial reaction may be anger, fear, or disbelief to what you don’t like or approve of, but then what are you going to do. Will you stay out of clear alignment or come to peace and back into resonance with the vibration of your Inner Being and Source?

What Is – Was.

What is – just is. Our reactions and perceptions are always ours to make. Mindful living means being aware of not only what happened, but also your feelings that tell you if you are clearly aligned or not.

Now – what is – is a continual stream of “nows”. It may help to accept without judgment what is to realize:

  • • It is constantly changing.
  • • It already happened. You may have a take away from it, but you cannot take it away or undo it. No amount of anger, fear, or disbelief will erase it.
  • • What it gives you is information about what you are vibrating, your point of attraction. What you manifest is always, no exceptions, a match to what you are vibrating. If it is what you want, keep up the good work. If it isn’t, change the thoughts of the Voice in your head.
  • • What is – clarifies what you do want. A manifestation of what you do not want makes very clear what you do want.

Process

Antidote Thoughts

Singer-songwriter, Jewel, was in her early 20’s when she was cast in her first movie, Ride with the Devil. Her anxiety went into overdrive she says, as she struggled with the pervasive thought, “I don’t know what I’m doing!” Her normal practices helped but not enough. So she created what she calls Antidote Thoughts, a practice she still uses today.

Again and again she turned to an Antidote Thought. “It would help me refocus in the moment and be receptive to actually get the information I needed to try and do a good job.” She recalls.

When negative thoughts –“lies your mind tells you,” Jewel calls them – take over she goes for the antidote. Starting with the opposite thought and working from there to find something that feels more true to you – feels good.

Example:

She started with the opposite thought from, “I don’t know what I am doing!” – “I do know what I’m doing,” and using her body as a barometer, tried it on for size. She could feel that this thought wasn’t true. So she experimented with other antidote thoughts. When she said, “I’m capable of learning and I won’t quit.” Her anxiety, her body, instantly felt calmer. That was her truth.

When you are experiencing a negative thought pattern try saying or writing antidote (opposite) thoughts until you find ones that feel good to think about.

july Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 22

Day 22 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I acknowledge the problem and speak of the solution.

You cannot notice what-is and complain about it, and be a vibrational match to the solution. When you were living the problem, you were asking for the solution, and Source said yes immediately.     ~  Abraham

The antidote for mind wandering is attention to attention itself: noticing that you’re not noticing what you should, then correcting, makes this crucial attention muscle stronger.     ~  Daniel Goldman


The Mindfulness Path to Peace With What Is

Spilt Milk

You go to pick up another dish and knock over a glass of milk.  Milk is dripping down over the counter, into drawers, and making a puddle on the floor. Now you are at choice.  Do you start berating yourself for not being more careful, yell at your partner for distracting you so that you weren’t aware of the glass, and complaining that there is no towel in easy reach or . . . do you just get on with wiping it up and appreciating that you’ve cleaned up a drawer that has needed attention and the glass did not break?

Okay, that’s not an earth shattering event, but it is a clear example of our choice to come to peace or not with what is, no matter what occurred. Yes, the initial reaction may be anger, fear, or disbelief to what you don’t like or approve of, but then what are you going to do.  Will you stay out of clear alignment or come to peace and back into resonance with the vibration of your Inner Being and Source?

What Is – Was.

What is – just is.  Our reactions and perceptions are always ours to make.  Mindful living means being aware of not only what happened, but also your feelings that tell you if you are clearly aligned or not.

Now – what is – is a continual stream of “nows”.  It may help to accept without judgment what is to realize:

  • • It is constantly changing.
  • • It already happened. You may have a take away from it, but you cannot take it away or undo it.  No amount of anger, fear, or disbelief will erase it.
  • • What it gives you is information about what you are vibrating, your point of attraction.  What you manifest is always, no exceptions, a match to what you are vibrating.  If it is what you want, keep up the good work.  If it isn’t, change the thoughts of the Voice in your head.
  • • What is – clarifies what you do want.  A manifestation of what you do not want makes very clear what you do want.

Process

Antidote Thoughts

Singer-songwriter, Jewel, was in her early 20’s when she was cast in her first movie, Ride with the Devil.  Her anxiety went into overdrive she says, as she struggled with the pervasive thought, “I don’t know what I’m doing!” Her normal practices helped but not enough. So she created what she calls Antidote Thoughts, a practice she still uses today.

Again and again she turned to an Antidote Thought. “It would help me refocus in the moment and be receptive to actually get the information I needed to try and do a good job.” She recalls.

When negative thoughts –“lies your mind tells you,” Jewel calls them – take over she goes for the antidote.  Starting with the opposite thought and working from there  to find something that feels more true to you – feels good.

Example:

She started with the opposite thought from, “I don’t know what I am doing!” – “I do know what I’m doing,” and using her body as a barometer, tried it on for size.  She could feel that this thought wasn’t true.  So she experimented with other antidote thoughts.  When she said, “I’m capable of learning and I won’t quit.” Her anxiety, her body, instantly felt calmer.  That  was her truth.

When you are experiencing a negative thought pattern try saying or writing  antidote (opposite) thoughts until you find ones that feel good to think about.

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 21

Day 21 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I quiet my mind and listen for the guidance from my Source.

You cannot just easily think about something else because law of attraction keeps dishing up more.  Showing you more in your now, helping you to remember it from your past, gathering from far and wide anything that is active in you.   ~  Abraham

The mind is its own place, and of itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.     ~  John Milton


Mindful Living On the Rise

The article, No Blueprint, Just Love in the February 2015 Mindful magazine tells us that mindful living is catching on.

In 1979, Jon Kabat-Zinn recruited chronically ill patients not responding well to traditional treatments to participate in his newly formed eight-week stress-reduction program. Now, 36 years later, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and its offshoots have entered the mainstream of health care, scientific study, and public policy.

High Hopes

His hope was that by starting a stress-reduction clinic based on relatively intensive training in mindfulness meditation and yoga – and their applications in everyday living – they could document how these practices might have a profound effect on the health and well-being of individuals. The larger purpose was to effect a kind of public-health intervention that would ultimately move the bell curve of the entire society. Now it is clear that mindful living manages stress, boosts concentration, reduces blood pressure and builds the immune system.

Going Deep

Those involved in the work have paid attention to the essential element that mindfulness is not a special state you achieve through a trick or technique. It is a way of being. If there is an instruction manual for being human, then Western science and medicine have supplied one part of it, and the contemplative traditions have supplied another – the part that has to do with discovering and cultivating our deep interior resources.

Lots and Lots of Mindfulness MBSR has grown to the point where they now talk about mindfulness-based interventions in all sorts of areas – depression, childbirth, education, addiction, to name a few. People can receive MBSR training in more than 500 locations in 42 of 50 states in the US, with more being added monthly.

Mindful Schools – one of a growing number of programs presenting mindfulness for students and teachers – has presented its in-school program to more than 18,000 students in 63 schools since 2007. In classrooms that implemented mindfulness programs, early results show an estimated 50% reduction in reactive behavior.

More than 80 corporations, small businesses and institutions worldwide have made mindfulness-based training available within their organizations.

Process

Walking Meditation ~ 10 minutes

There are many forms of walking meditation. This is a simple one that relies on a pace that is close to how we might walk in everyday life so it can be adapted for walking in the street – just as long as you remember to pay attention to street lights and other people.

  • • Stand up straight with your back upright but not stiff. Feel your feet touching the ground and let your weight distribute evenly.
  • • Curl the thumb of your left hand in and wrap your fingers around it. Place it just above your belly button. Wrap your right hand around it, resting your right thumb in the crevice formed between your left thumb and index finger. (This creates some balance for you and keeps your swinging arms from being a distraction)
  • • Drop your gaze slightly. This helps you maintain focus.
  • • Step out with your left foot. Feel it swing, feel the heel hit the ground, now the ball, now the toes.
  • • Feel the same as the right foot comes forward.
  • • Walk at a steady pace, slightly slower than in daily life but not funereal. When your attention wanders, bring it back to the sensations of your feet touching the ground.

From Barry Boyce, editor, Mindful Magazine

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 20

Day 20 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I am open to receiving the guidance from Source.

Source Energy is continually transmitting guidance to each of you.  ~  Abraham

The breeze of grace is always blowing on you, but you have to unfurl your sails.  ~  Sri Ramakrisna


Mindful Living On the Rise

The article, No Blueprint, Just Love in the February 2015 Mindful magazine tells us that mindful living is catching on.

In 1979, Jon Kabat-Zinn recruited chronically ill patients not responding well to traditional treatments to participate in his newly formed eight-week stress-reduction program. Now, 36 years later, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and its offshoots have entered the mainstream of health care, scientific study, and public policy.

High Hopes

His hope was that by starting a stress-reduction clinic based on relatively intensive training in mindfulness meditation and yoga – and their applications in everyday living – they could document how these practices might have a profound effect on the health and well-being of individuals. The larger purpose was to effect a kind of public-health intervention that would ultimately move the bell curve of the entire society. Now it is clear that mindful living manages stress, boosts concentration, reduces blood pressure and builds the immune system.

Going Deep

Those involved in the work have paid attention to the essential element that mindfulness is not a special state you achieve through a trick or technique. It is a way of being. If there is an instruction manual for being human, then Western science and medicine have supplied one part of it, and the contemplative traditions have supplied another – the part that has to do with discovering and cultivating our deep interior resources.

Lots and Lots of Mindfulness

MBSR has grown to the point where they now talk about mindfulness-based interventions in all sorts of areas – depression, childbirth, education, addiction, to name a few. People can receive MBSR training in more than 500 locations in 42 of 50 states in the US, with more being added monthly.

Mindful Schools – one of a growing number of programs presenting mindfulness for students and teachers – has presented its in-school program to more than 18,000 students in 63 schools since 2007. In classrooms that implemented mindfulness programs, early results show an estimated 50% reduction in reactive behavior.

More than 80 corporations, small businesses and institutions worldwide have made mindfulness-based training available within their organizations.

Process

Walking Meditation ~ 10 minutes

There are many forms of walking meditation. This is a simple one that relies on a pace that is close to how we might walk in everyday life so it can be adapted for walking in the street – just as long as you remember to pay attention to street lights and other people.

  • • Stand up straight with your back upright but not stiff. Feel your feet touching the ground and let your weight distribute evenly.
  • • Curl the thumb of your left hand in and wrap your fingers around it. Place it just above your belly button. Wrap your right hand around it, resting your right thumb in the crevice formed between your left thumb and index finger. (This creates some balance for you and keeps your swinging arms from being a distraction)
  • • Drop your gaze slightly. This helps you maintain focus.
  • • Step out with your left foot. Feel it swing, feel the heel hit the ground, now the ball, now the toes.
  • • Feel the same as the right foot comes forward.
  • • Walk at a steady pace, slightly slower than in daily life but not funereal. When your attention wanders, bring it back to the sensations of your feet touching the ground.

From Barry Boyce, editor, Mindful Magazine

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 19

Day 19 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I appreciate the calm feeling I get when meditating.

Meditation is a way to experience the vibrations of your Source Energy.  ~  Abraham

My goal is to get us to invest more in the most important asset we have in America – well-functioning human beings.  Mindfulness practice gives me a feeling of calm that allows me to manage my day.   ~  Tim Ryan, US Congressman of Ohio


Mindful Living On the Rise

The article, No Blueprint, Just Love in the February 2015 Mindful magazine tells us that mindful living is catching on.

In 1979, Jon Kabat-Zinn recruited chronically ill patients not responding well to traditional treatments to participate in his newly formed eight-week stress-reduction program. Now, 36 years later, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and its offshoots have entered the mainstream of health care, scientific study, and public policy.

High Hopes

His hope was that by starting a stress-reduction clinic based on relatively intensive training in mindfulness meditation and yoga – and their applications in everyday living – they could document how these practices might have a profound effect on the health and well-being of individuals. The larger purpose was to effect a kind of public-health intervention that would ultimately move the bell curve of the entire society. Now it is clear that mindful living manages stress, boosts concentration, reduces blood pressure and builds the immune system.

Going Deep

Those involved in the work have paid attention to the essential element that mindfulness is not a special state you achieve through a trick or technique. It is a way of being. If there is an instruction manual for being human, then Western science and medicine have supplied one part of it, and the contemplative traditions have supplied another – the part that has to do with discovering and cultivating our deep interior resources.

Lots and Lots of Mindfulness

MBSR has grown to the point where they now talk about mindfulness-based interventions in all sorts of areas – depression, childbirth, education, addiction, to name a few. People can receive MBSR training in more than 500 locations in 42 of 50 states in the US, with more being added monthly.

Mindful Schools – one of a growing number of programs presenting mindfulness for students and teachers – has presented its in-school program to more than 18,000 students in 63 schools since 2007. In classrooms that implemented mindfulness programs, early results show an estimated 50% reduction in reactive behavior.

More than 80 corporations, small businesses and institutions worldwide have made mindfulness-based training available within their organizations.

Process

Walking Meditation ~ 10 minutes

There are many forms of walking meditation. This is a simple one that relies on a pace that is close to how we might walk in everyday life so it can be adapted for walking in the street – just as long as you remember to pay attention to street lights and other people.

  • • Stand up straight with your back upright but not stiff. Feel your feet touching the ground and let your weight distribute evenly.
  • • Curl the thumb of your left hand in and wrap your fingers around it. Place it just above your belly button. Wrap your right hand around it, resting your right thumb in the crevice formed between your left thumb and index finger. (This creates some balance for you and keeps your swinging arms from being a distraction)
  • • Drop your gaze slightly. This helps you maintain focus.
  • • Step out with your left foot. Feel it swing, feel the heel hit the ground, now the ball, now the toes.
  • • Feel the same as the right foot comes forward.
  • • Walk at a steady pace, slightly slower than in daily life but not funereal. When your attention wanders, bring it back to the sensations of your feet touching the ground.

From Barry Boyce, editor, Mindful Magazine

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 18

Day 18 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I look to feeling good physically and mentally.

Unless you do something about your vibrational countenance, nothing can change.  ~  Abraham

Mental and spiritual health is often the lowest priority in health care, even though it may actually be the most important thing.   ~  James Gordon, M.D.


Mindful Living On the Rise

The article, No Blueprint, Just Love in the February 2015 Mindful magazine tells us that mindful living is catching on.

In 1979, Jon Kabat-Zinn recruited chronically ill patients not responding well to traditional treatments to participate in his newly formed eight-week stress-reduction program. Now, 36 years later, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and its offshoots have entered the mainstream of health care, scientific study, and public policy.

High Hopes

His hope was that by starting a stress-reduction clinic based on relatively intensive training in mindfulness meditation and yoga – and their applications in everyday living – they could document how these practices might have a profound effect on the health and well-being of individuals. The larger purpose was to effect a kind of public-health intervention that would ultimately move the bell curve of the entire society. Now it is clear that mindful living manages stress, boosts concentration, reduces blood pressure and builds the immune system.

Going Deep

Those involved in the work have paid attention to the essential element that mindfulness is not a special state you achieve through a trick or technique. It is a way of being. If there is an instruction manual for being human, then Western science and medicine have supplied one part of it, and the contemplative traditions have supplied another – the part that has to do with discovering and cultivating our deep interior resources.

Lots and Lots of Mindfulness MBSR has grown to the point where they now talk about mindfulness-based interventions in all sorts of areas – depression, childbirth, education, addiction, to name a few. People can receive MBSR training in more than 500 locations in 42 of 50 states in the US, with more being added monthly.

Mindful Schools – one of a growing number of programs presenting mindfulness for students and teachers – has presented its in-school program to more than 18,000 students in 63 schools since 2007. In classrooms that implemented mindfulness programs, early results show an estimated 50% reduction in reactive behavior.

More than 80 corporations, small businesses and institutions worldwide have made mindfulness-based training available within their organizations.

Process

Walking Meditation ~ 10 minutes

There are many forms of walking meditation. This is a simple one that relies on a pace that is close to how we might walk in everyday life so it can be adapted for walking in the street – just as long as you remember to pay attention to street lights and other people.

  • • Stand up straight with your back upright but not stiff. Feel your feet touching the ground and let your weight distribute evenly.
  • • Curl the thumb of your left hand in and wrap your fingers around it. Place it just above your belly button. Wrap your right hand around it, resting your right thumb in the crevice formed between your left thumb and index finger. (This creates some balance for you and keeps your swinging arms from being a distraction)
  • • Drop your gaze slightly. This helps you maintain focus.
  • • Step out with your left foot. Feel it swing, feel the heel hit the ground, now the ball, now the toes.
  • • Feel the same as the right foot comes forward.
  • • Walk at a steady pace, slightly slower than in daily life but not funereal. When your attention wanders, bring it back to the sensations of your feet touching the ground.

From Barry Boyce, editor, Mindful Magazine

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 17

Day 17 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I shift my attention to what brings a pleasant feeling.

Some say, “Well, Abraham you teach selfishness.” And we say, yes we do, yes we do, yes we do, because unless you are selfish enough to reach for that connection, you don’t have anything to give anyone, anyway. And when you are selfish enough to make that connection—you have an enormous gift that you give everywhere you are.    ~  Abraham

Strange as it may seem today to say, the aim of life is to live, and to live means to be aware, joyously, drunkenly, serenely, divinely aware.  ~  Henry Miller


Mindful Living On the Rise

The article, No Blueprint, Just Love in the February 2015 Mindful magazine tells us that mindful living is catching on.

In 1979, Jon Kabat-Zinn recruited chronically ill patients not responding well to traditional treatments to participate in his newly formed eight-week stress-reduction program. Now, 36 years later, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and its offshoots have entered the mainstream of health care, scientific study, and public policy.

High Hopes

His hope was that by starting a stress-reduction clinic based on relatively intensive training in mindfulness meditation and yoga – and their applications in everyday living – they could document how these practices might have a profound effect on the health and well-being of individuals. The larger purpose was to effect a kind of public-health intervention that would ultimately move the bell curve of the entire society. Now it is clear that mindful living manages stress, boosts concentration, reduces blood pressure and builds the immune system.

Going Deep

Those involved in the work have paid attention to the essential element that mindfulness is not a special state you achieve through a trick or technique. It is a way of being. If there is an instruction manual for being human, then Western science and medicine have supplied one part of it, and the contemplative traditions have supplied another – the part that has to do with discovering and cultivating our deep interior resources.

Lots and Lots of Mindfulness

MBSR has grown to the point where they now talk about mindfulness-based interventions in all sorts of areas – depression, childbirth, education, addiction, to name a few. People can receive MBSR training in more than 500 locations in 42 of 50 states in the US, with more being added monthly.

Mindful Schools – one of a growing number of programs presenting mindfulness for students and teachers – has presented its in-school program to more than 18,000 students in 63 schools since 2007. In classrooms that implemented mindfulness programs, early results show an estimated 50% reduction in reactive behavior.

More than 80 corporations, small businesses and institutions worldwide have made mindfulness-based training available within their organizations.

Process

Walking Meditation ~ 10 minutes

There are many forms of walking meditation. This is a simple one that relies on a pace that is close to how we might walk in everyday life so it can be adapted for walking in the street – just as long as you remember to pay attention to street lights and other people.

  • • Stand up straight with your back upright but not stiff. Feel your feet touching the ground and let your weight distribute evenly.
  • • Curl the thumb of your left hand in and wrap your fingers around it. Place it just above your belly button. Wrap your right hand around it, resting your right thumb in the crevice formed between your left thumb and index finger. (This creates some balance for you and keeps your swinging arms from being a distraction)
  • • Drop your gaze slightly. This helps you maintain focus.
  • • Step out with your left foot. Feel it swing, feel the heel hit the ground, now the ball, now the toes.
  • • Feel the same as the right foot comes forward.
  • • Walk at a steady pace, slightly slower than in daily life but not funereal. When your attention wanders, bring it back to the sensations of your feet touching the ground.

From Barry Boyce, editor, Mindful Magazine

July Daily Vibes | Mindfulness Day 16

Day 16 Law of Attraction Centering Thought

I treat my mind to peaceful thoughts.

Treating the body really is about treating the mind.  It is all psychosomatic. Every bit of it, no exceptions.  ~  Abraham

Scanning the landscape and choosing what to focus on and what to leave in the background is one of our greatest gifts. . .  Why not train and improve this ability?   ~  Daniel Goleman


Mindful Living On the Rise

The article, No Blueprint, Just Love in the February 2015 Mindful magazine tells us that mindful living is catching on.

In 1979, Jon Kabat-Zinn recruited chronically ill patients not responding well to traditional treatments to participate in his newly formed eight-week stress-reduction program. Now, 36 years later, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and its offshoots have entered the mainstream of health care, scientific study, and public policy.

High Hopes

His hope was that by starting a stress-reduction clinic based on relatively intensive training in mindfulness meditation and yoga – and their applications in everyday living – they could document how these practices might have a profound effect on the health and well-being of individuals. The larger purpose was to effect a kind of public-health intervention that would ultimately move the bell curve of the entire society. Now it is clear that mindful living manages stress, boosts concentration, reduces blood pressure and builds the immune system.

Going Deep

Those involved in the work have paid attention to the essential element that mindfulness is not a special state you achieve through a trick or technique. It is a way of being. If there is an instruction manual for being human, then Western science and medicine have supplied one part of it, and the contemplative traditions have supplied another – the part that has to do with discovering and cultivating our deep interior resources.

Lots and Lots of Mindfulness MBSR has grown to the point where they now talk about mindfulness-based interventions in all sorts of areas – depression, childbirth, education, addiction, to name a few. People can receive MBSR training in more than 500 locations in 42 of 50 states in the US, with more being added monthly.

Mindful Schools – one of a growing number of programs presenting mindfulness for students and teachers – has presented its in-school program to more than 18,000 students in 63 schools since 2007. In classrooms that implemented mindfulness programs, early results show an estimated 50% reduction in reactive behavior.

More than 80 corporations, small businesses and institutions worldwide have made mindfulness-based training available within their organizations.

Process

Walking Meditation ~ 10 minutes

There are many forms of walking meditation. This is a simple one that relies on a pace that is close to how we might walk in everyday life so it can be adapted for walking in the street – just as long as you remember to pay attention to street lights and other people.

  • • Stand up straight with your back upright but not stiff. Feel your feet touching the ground and let your weight distribute evenly.
  • • Curl the thumb of your left hand in and wrap your fingers around it. Place it just above your belly button. Wrap your right hand around it, resting your right thumb in the crevice formed between your left thumb and index finger. (This creates some balance for you and keeps your swinging arms from being a distraction)
  • • Drop your gaze slightly. This helps you maintain focus.
  • • Step out with your left foot. Feel it swing, feel the heel hit the ground, now the ball, now the toes.
  • • Feel the same as the right foot comes forward.
  • • Walk at a steady pace, slightly slower than in daily life but not funereal. When your attention wanders, bring it back to the sensations of your feet touching the ground.

From Barry Boyce, editor, Mindful Magazine